Chapter 1.

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FIRST AID

Note:
Procedure standards for untrained lay people as well as medical people with "bare hands" if they encounter an unconscious person with head injury.

Contents:
1.1.: An unconscious person with head injury
1.2.: Basic life support
1.3.: Management
1.4.: Documentation/records

 STANDARD 1.1.: AN UNCONSCIOUS PERSON WITH HEAD INJURY Hvezdicka.GIF (147 bytes)

If you encounter an unconscious person with head injuries you should check whether the person:
1. is actually unconscious,
2. is breathing,
3. has a pulse,
4. has any other injuries (chest, abdomen, spine, extremities),
5. is bleeding.
Call for help (charge-free emergency services number 155). Begin giving first aid according to your ability and circumstances, and continue to do so until the professional emergency sevices arrive.

STANDARD 1.2.: BASIC LIFE SUPPORT Hvezdicka.GIF (147 bytes)

If the person is unconscious, not breathing and/or has no pulse, begin resuscitation.

STANDARD 1.3.: FIRST AID MANAGEMENT Hvezdicka.GIF (147 bytes)

If the person is unconscious but breathing and has a pulse:
1. according to the clinical state and circumstances, put the person into a supine or the recovery position.
2. Establish an airway.
3. Cover any open head injury with a sterile dressing if available (e.g. first-aid kit in the boot of your car).
4. Never tampon bleeding from external auditory tubes - just cover it with sterile dressings if available.
5. Keep the person warm (put a mat under them or cover him or her with clothes), check regularly for level of consciousness, breathing, and possible bleeding.
6. Do not give any food or water, though the mouth can be moistened.
7. If transporting the person, be certain to avoid any risky head movements.
8. For victims of motor vehicle accidents and falls, injury to the cervical spine and cord should always be assumed
to be present.

STANDARD 1.4.: DOCUMENTATION/RECORDS Hvezdicka.GIF (147 bytes)

Record all important data on a piece of paper if available (if you have a person to help you, it might be easier to dictate your findings to him or her as you examine the injured person):
1. first describe the examination of the person,
2. then your procedure,
3. if known, be certain to write down the cause, nature, and time of injury.

Coordinated by Jiri POKORNY Jr., M.D.

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Last updated: 1999-09-06